Takashima Ekidan
     

The Zhouyi text of the Takashima Ekidan

The Takashima Ekidan fills a niche, as it is one of the earliest English translations of the I Ching; but in this case, it is a translation of an earlier Japanese version.  It is thus something like the Japanese Wilhelm-Baynes version, although its 1893 date places it closer in time to James Legges translation.  A reproduction of the original 317-page book is available for download from Google Books (U.S. only), as well as Joel Birocos site.  It includes an introduction that describes a method of counting off yarrow stalks in groups of 8 to determine the trigrams, then in groups of 6 to determine one moving line.  (I cant resist quoting a little of it below.)  Most of the hexagram texts are followed by several real-life examples of actual use; this is arguably the most interesting aspect of the book.

Now turn your sole attention to the affair to be divined, close your eyes, suspend your breaths, make yourself solemn and pure, be sure that you are in interview with the Almighty to receive his order, and further, do not diversify your thoughts to anything else.  At the moment when your purity of heart is at its apex, divide the sticks into any two groups with your right-hand thumb.  The division must not be voluntary.

Because of its value as an early eastern perspective on the I Ching, and because it is relatively little-known, I have converted the Zhouyi text of the work into HTML format for easy accessibility.  I have corrected gross misprints and standardized the punctuation; I have not otherwise changed the wording of the text.

PDF versions:  half-letter (341 KB), A5 (345 KB).


THE
TAKASHIMA EKIDAN
BY
SHIGETAKE SUGIURA,
TRANSLATED FROM
THE WORK
OF
KAEMON TAKASHIMA.

KEIGYŌSHA,
TŌKYŌ,
(2553) 26TH. MEIJI (1893).

I.  KEN  (Heaven).

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Ken is what is perfect, auspicious, useful, and constant.

Positive I.  Represents the obscure dragon lying hidden.  Better not move.

Positive II.  The dragon appearing in the field; advantageous to see great men.

Positive III.  Honourable men employ themselves assiduously all day long, and are wide awake from morning to evening.  Though dangerous, yet free from blame.

Positive IV.  The dragon is as if he were leaping, but in the deep.  Free from blame.

Positive V.  The dragon has flown up into the heaven.  Advantageous to see great men.

Positive VI.  The dragon is in a state of excesses; and is beset with remorse.

The Mode of Using the Positives.  Lucky, if all the dragons are so humble as if they had no heads.

II.  KON  (Earth).

   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   

Kon is perfect and auspicious.  Advantageous to the constancy of mares.  In undertaking any thing, honourable men will become perplexed, if they take precedence over others; while if they keep themselves behind others they will be successful; and in all things they should aim at utility.  They will get friends in the south-west and lose others in the north-east.  But if they are contented and constant, they will be lucky.

Negative I.  We first tread upon frost and then come to hard ice.

Negative II.  Represents that is honest, upright, and comprehensive, and is useful in every way, without ever receiving instruction.

Negative III.  Keep your accomplishments secret and be constant.  If you apply yourself to the kings affairs, you will not be successful at first, but you will at last succeed.

Negative IV.  Tightens the mouth of the purse, and is free from blame, although he does not get honours.

Negative V.  Is a yellow dress, and is perfectly lucky.

Negative VI.  A dragon fights in the field, and its blood is darkish yellow.

The Mode of Using the Negatives.  Advantageous to be persistent and constant.

III.  CHUN  (Fulness).

   
 
 
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 

Chun.  Perfectly auspicious; advantageous to be constant; not propitious to make movements; advantageous to establish dukedoms.

Positive I.  Is at a stand-still; advantageous to be constant; and advantageous to be created a duke.

Negative II.  Is perplexed and receding; she mounts a horse, but is unable to advance.  Negative II is not invaded, but is sought after for marriage.  The woman is constant and does not marry.  She marries ten years hence.

Negative III.  Hunts deers without a guide, and advances far into the forest.  Honourable men had better, in such a case, abandon the chase.  Inauspicious to advance.

Negative IV.  Mounts a horse, but is unable to advance; seeks to marry; lucky if she advance, and every thing would be in an advantageous state.

Positive V.  With-holds his benevolence.  Lucky in small things, if he is constant.  Unlucky in large things, though he be constant.

Negative VI.  Mounts a horse, but is unable to advance; and bloody tears are pouring down.

IV.  M  (Infancy).

 
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 
 
   

M.  Auspicious; we do not apply to children; children do apply to us.  The first divination is answered, but repetition is blasphemous; and when blasphemous, it is not answered.  Advantageous to be constant.

Negative I.  In opening M to light it is advantageous to hold men liable to punishments, and to unfasten shackles.  To rely entirely upon punishments is inauspicious.

Positive II.  Is lucky to take [under his instruction] the whole M; and lucky to take in a woman.  The son skilfully manages the household affairs.

Negative III.  Do not take a woman in marriage: she will be attracted by rich men and will not remain constant.  There will be no advantage [in marrying her].

Negative IV.  Is sunk in M; inauspicious.

Negative V.  Is an infant; and is lucky.

Positive VI.  Attacks M.  Disadvantageous to make an assault, but advantageous to defend against an assault.

V.  JU  (To wait).

   
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 

Ju.  Bright and auspicious, when there is truthfulness; lucky, when there is constancy; advantageous to wade a large river.

Positive I.  Represents what is waiting in the suburbs; advantageous to maintain steadiness; free from blame.

Positive II.  Is waiting in the sand; there will be some murmurings; but lucky in the end.

Positive III.  Is waiting in the mud; and invites invaders.

Negative IV.  Is waiting in the blood; emerges from a hole.

Positive V.  Is treating [guests] with drink and food; lucky, if constant.

Negative VI.  Enters a hole; three uninvited visitors will come; lucky in the end, if one treat them with respect.

VI.  SH  (Lawsuit).

 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   

Sh.  Suffering from wrong though conforming with veracity; lucky, when the spirit of modesty leads to an early conclusion [of the suit]; unlucky, when [the suit] is prosecuted to the last; advantageous to see great men; disadvantageous to wade a large river.

Negative I.  Represents what does not stick long to any undertaking, and is somewhat liable to murmurs, but is lucky in the end.

Positive II.  Is unable to maintain the suit, and goes home and flies away; but the three hundred families in the village are free from any calamity.

Negative III.  Returns to his original profession; lucky in the end, when there is constancy, though involving some danger.  If he engages himself in the kings affairs, he will accomplish nothing.

Positive IV.  Is unable to maintain the suit, turns back and submits to reason; lucky, if he changes his mind and remains constant.

Positive V.  The suit will be perfectly lucky.

Positive VI.  A robe of state may be bestowed on [the Positive VI]; but it will be thrice revoked before the morning passes away.

VII.  SHI  (Army).

   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 
 
   

Shi.  Righteous.  Lucky and free from blame if he is a venerable man [who commands the army].

Negative I.  An army must move with discipline.  Unlucky, if not in good order.

Positive II.  Occupies the middle position in Shi, it is lucky and free from blame.  The king favours him with his words three times.

Negative III.  An army may carry corpses by cart; unlucky.

Negative IV.  An army encamps on a retired position; it is free from evils.

Negative V.  There are games to hunt; advantageous to remonstrate; free from blame.  Good if a venerable man command the army; but unlucky if a youth convey corpses by cart.

Negative VI.  The August king distributes rewards; and he founds states and settles houses.  Do not take small-minded men into favour.

VIII.  HI  (Friendship).

   
 
 
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   

Hi.  Lucky.  Enquire and divine, and if [the friend, whom one wishes to be his, is] perfect, persistent, and constant, there will be no blame.  Though not yet easy in mind, yet [followers] will come, and one that shall come late, shall be unlucky.

Negative I.  When one forms friendship with the truthful, he will be free from blame.  When there is truthfulness enough to fill an oblation bottle, good fortunes will indirectly come in the end.

Negative II.  Cultivates friendship with a sincere heart.  Lucky, if constant.

Negative III.  Cultivates friendship with a wrong person.

Negative IV.  Cultivates friendship abroad.  Lucky, if constant.

Positive V.  Maintains his friendship openly.  The King urging his pursuit of game on three directions [only], and allowing the escape of all the animals before him.  The townsfolk will be reasonable without any injunction.

Negative VI.  Makes a wrong beginning in friendship.  Unlucky.

IX.  SH-CHIKU  (Small Stoppage).

 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 

Sh-Chiku.  Auspicious.  Clouds are dense, but it rains not.  They come from our western outskirts.

Positive I.  Turns back for the sake of principle.  How can he be blamed?  He is lucky.

Positive II.  Turns back in company with [Positive I]; he is lucky.

Positive III.  A carriage is detached into separate parts by taking off the key which secures the wheel to the shaft.  A husband and a wife look at each other with malice.

Negative IV.  Is truthful.  Blood escapes, and caution comes forth.  Free from blame.

Positive V.  Is truthful and affectionate; and enjoys his wealth with his neighbours.

Positive VI.  It has already rained and one has already settled down.  One esteems virtues and virtues become great enough to load a cart with.  A woman is dangerous, though she may be constant.  The moon is near its full.  Unlucky, if honourable men advance.

X.  RI  (To tramp).

 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 

Ri.  A tigers tail is tramped, but it does not devour the man.  Auspicious.

Positive I.  Pursues an unsullied career and may advance without the fear of being blamed.

Positive II.  Goes over the road smoothly.  Lucky, if he is constant like a hermit.

Negative III.  The one-eyed are enabled to see, and the lame are enabled to walk.  A tigers tail is tramped, and it devours the man; unlucky.  A military man wishes to become a great sovereign.

Positive IV.  Tramps a tigers tail.  Lucky in the end, if he be cautious.

Positive V.  Is resolute in action.  Dangerous, though constant.

Positive VI.  Estimates his happiness if he take advantages of the past career.  If it be complete and without failure, there will be a perfect luckiness.

XI.  TAI  (Non-obstruction).

   
 
   
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 

Tai.  The small go away and the large come, and it is lucky and auspicious.

Positive I.  In pulling up rushes, roots come off in a mass, consisting of the same variety.  Lucky to advance.

Positive II.  Tolerates wasteness, employs the daring, and does not discard the distant.  When factions are annihilated, the path of mean will be respected.

Positive III.  There is nothing level which does not incline, and nothing goes but does not return.  Free from blame, if hardy and constant.  If free from anxieties, and truthful, blissful at the lunar eclipse.

Negative IV.  Is flighty; is not rich; is in concord with neighbours; and is truthful without a warning.

Negative V.  A princess of blood is given in marriage.  Blissful and perfectly lucky.

Negative VI.  The castle has tumbled down into the moat.  Do not go to war.  The townsfolk issue orders.  Inauspicious, though constant.

XII.  HI  (Obstruction).

 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
   
 
   

Hi is against humanity; not advantageous to the constancy of honourable men; the great go away and the small come.

Negative I.  In pulling up rushes, roots come off in a mass, consisting of the same variety.  Lucky and auspicious, if constant.

Negative II.  Is submissive.  Lucky for small-minded men.  Obstructive yet auspicious for great men.

Negative III.  Veils his shame.

Positive IV.  An order is given.  Free from blame.  Friends receive felicity.

Positive V.  Stops Hi.  Lucky for great men.  How critical!  How critical!  [Make it as secure as if] it be fastened to a densely grown mulberry grove.

Positive VI.  Gives a turn to Hi.  Obstructed at first, but rejoicing in the end.

XIII.  D-JIN  (Fellowship).

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 

Fellowship is formed in a plain; advantageous to wade a large river, and advantageous to the constancy of honourable men.

Positive I.  Fellowship is formed at the gate; free from blame.

Negative II.  Fellowship is formed with the family of the main stock; inauspicious.

Positive III.  Stations an ambuscade among bushes, and himself goes up a hill close by, but is unable to call [his troops] to action for three years.

Positive IV.  Gets on the wall, but can not attack; lucky.

Positive V.  At first cries in forming fellowship, but at last he laughs.  The mighty armies are victorious and meet together.

Positive VI.  Fellowship is formed in a suburb; free from remorse.

XIV.  TAI-Y  (A mighty possession).

 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Tai-Y.  Perfectly auspicious.

Positive I.  Is as yet free from contact with harms; it is not to be blamed, and free from blame, if hardy.

Positive II.  Is loaded like a large vehicle; advances; and is free from blame.

Positive III.  A duke is invited to the royal table.  Small-minded men can not [be invited].

Positive IV.  Is not proud of his splendor, and is free from blame.

Negative V.  His truthfulness is mutual.  Lucky, if awe-inspiring.

Positive VI.  Heaven assists him.  Lucky, and advantageous in every respect.

XV.  KEN  (Modesty).

   
 
   
 
   
 
 
 
   
 
   

Ken.  Auspicious.  Honourable men will have a [happy] end.

Negative I.  Is exceedingly modest, and is a sage.  Lucky to wade a large river.

Negative II.  Is noted for his modesty, and will be lucky, if constant.

Positive III.  Is assiduous and modest, and is an honourable man; will have an honourable end, and will be lucky.

Negative IV.  Advantageous in every way, but [you must] recommend to a modest person.

Negative V.  Is not fertile in intellect, and consults with his neighbour.  Advantageous to undertake an expedition.  Advantageous in every way.

Negative VI.  Proclaims his modesty.  Advantageous to lead an army and subjugate provinces.

XVI.  YO  (Enjoyment).

   
 
   
 
 
 
   
 
   
 
   

Yo.  Advantageous to establish dukedoms and to lead an army.

Negative I.  Proclaims his enjoyment, and will be unlucky.

Negative II.  Stands between rocks; does not wait till the end of the day; and will be lucky, if constant.

Negative III.  Is inconsistent in enjoyment.  Remorse will attend him, if he is late to repent.

Positive IV.  [All others] enjoy through the medium of [Positive IV]; and [Positive IV] is very successful.  Do not doubt, for friends will assemble together.

Negative V.  Suffers from a settled disease but as he pursues a normal course, he does not die.

Negative VI.  Is blind in enjoyment.  Though blind, he will be free from blame, if he reforms himself.

XVII.  ZUI  (To obey).

   
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
   
 
 

Zui.  Perfectly auspicious, advantageous to be constant, and free from blame.

Positive I.  Changes his official capacity.  Lucky, if just.  Successful, if he forms friendship outside the gate.

Negative II.  Loses a great man by his attachment to a small man.

Negative III.  Loses a small man by his attachment to a great man.  He will gain much, if he obeys the great man and asks him.  Advantageous to stand by constancy.

Positive IV.  Gains much being obeyed by [Positive II].  Unlucky, though constant.  If one be truthful and wise, what blame can there be?

Positive V.  Is truthful on congratulatory occasions and will be lucky.

Negative VI.  Is bound, and fastened, and further tightened.  The king accordingly celebrates [his ancestors] at the West Mountain.

XVIII.  KO  (Affairs).

 
 
   
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
   

Ko.  Perfectly auspicious, and advantageous to wade a large river.  Three days previous to the time and three days after the time.

Negative I.  Manages his fathers affairs.  When there is a son, the father will be free.  Lucky in the end, though dangerous.

Positive II.  Manages his mothers affairs.  One ought not to stick to the affairs with constancy.

Positive III.  Manages his fathers affairs.  There will be some remorse, but free any great blame.

Negative IV.  Leisurely manages his fathers affairs.  Inauspicious to advance.

Negative V.  Manages his fathers affairs, and gets honour.

Positive VI.  Does not offer his service to kings and princes, and maintains a noble standing.

XIX.  RIN  (To look Down).

   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 
 
 

Rin.  Perfectly auspicious, and advantageous to be constant.  In August will come an ill-luck.

Positive I.  Looks full in the face, and will be lucky if constant.

Positive II.  Looks full in the face, will be lucky, and advantageous in every respect.

Negative III.  Looks with fawnings and will not be advantageous in any way.  If he is sorry for it, he will be free from blame.

Negative IV.  Looks in earnest, and will be free from blame.

Negative V.  Looks with wisdom, which is a proper course for a great sovereign.  He will be lucky.

Negative VI.  Is honest in looking at [things], will be lucky, and free from blame.

XX.  KWAN  (To observe or to show).

 
 
 
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   

Kwan.  [Positive V] washes his hands, but before he sets offerings, his truthfulness makes [the people] look up to him with reverence.

Negative I.  Is childish in observation.  Small-minded men will be free from blame, but inauspicious for honourable men.

Negative II.  Sees by peeping.  Advantageous to the constancy of a woman.

Negative III.  Decides his movement by observing his own nature.

Negative IV.  Sees the light of the country, and is advantageous to be the guest of the King.

Positive V.  Observes his own nature.  If he is an honourable man, he will be free from blame.

Positive VI.  Observes his own nature.  If he is an honourable man, he will be free from blame.

XXI.  JEI-K  (To cram).

 
 
   
 
 
 
   
 
   
 
 

Jei-k.  Auspicious, and advantageous to decide cases.

Positive I.  Stops the foot by using fetters.  Free from evils.

Negative II.  Bites the skin and destroys the nose, and will be free from blame.

Negative III.  Musticates dried flesh, and suffers from poison; somewhat inauspicious, but free from blame.

Positive IV.  Musticates dried bony flesh and obtains a gold arrow.  It will be advantageous to be hardy and constant, and will be lucky.

Negative V.  Musticates dried flesh, and obtains gold, and will be free from blame, if he is constant and cautious.

Positive VI.  Bears shackles and destroys the ear.  Unlucky.

XXII.  HI  (To embellish).

 
 
   
 
   
 
 
 
   
 
 

Hi.  Auspicious; somewhat advantageous to advance.

Positive I.  Embellishes his feet, and leaving the carriage takes to walking.

Negative II.  Embellishes his mustache.

Positive III.  Is embellished and glossy, and will be lucky, if permanently constant.

Negative IV.  Is embellished yet is white.  A white horse is running; it does not [intend to] attack, but wishes to marry.

Negative V.  Embellishes hills and gardens, and makes presents in very small quantities.  Lucky in the end, though inauspicious.

Positive VI.  Embellishes himself with white and will be free from evils.

XXIII.  HAKU  (To take away, to deprive).

 
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   

Haku.  Not advantageous to advance.

Negative I.  Deprives a bed of its supports.  Unlucky, if not constant.

Negative II.  Deprives a bed of its bottom.  Unlucky, if not constant.

Negative III.  Is free from blame in the time of Haku.

Negative IV.  Is about to injure his own skin after destroying a bed.  Unlucky.

Negative V.  Keeps [the negative elements together like] so many fishes arranged with a skewer passing through them, and courts favour like a courtier.  Advantageous in every respect.

Positive VI.  Is [like] a large fruit which has escaped being eaten up.  An honourable man, will get a vehicle; while a small-minded man will lose his cottage.

XXIV.  FUKU  (To return).

   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 

Fuku.  Auspicious.  Free from obstacles in going out and coming in.  Friends may come without occasioning any blame.  Going along a road, [Fuku] returns back in seven days.  Advantageous to advance.

Positive I.  Returns before long.  He will not come to remorse.  Perfectly lucky.

Negative II.  Returns in an admirable manner.  Lucky. 

Negative III.  Incessantly returns.  Free from blame, though dangerous.

Negative IV.  Goes in the middle, but returns alone.

Negative V.  Is honest in returning, and will be free from remorse.

Negative VI.  Gets astray in returning.  Unlucky.  Calamities will befall him.  If an army is sent out, a great defeat will be attained in the end.  Unlucky even for the sovereign of the country.  The conquest can not be effected in ten years.

XXV.  BU-B  (Truthfulness, without insincerity).

 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
   
 
 

Bu-b.  Perfectly auspicious, and advantageous to be constant.  There will be calamities, if one is not just.  Not advantageous to advance.

Positive I.  Is truthful, and will be lucky to advance.

Negative II.  Harvests crops without cultivation, and plants without levelling up the soil.  Advantageous to advance.  Note.This line has double meaning.  The converse is also true.

Negative III.  There is a calamity to Bu-b.  Suppose a cattle is tied [at a certain village]; a travellers gain will be the villagers calamity.

Positive IV.  Be constant, and you will be free from blame.

Positive V.  Suffers from a disease of Bu-b, but shall have a joy, without using medicines.

Positive VI.  Is [at the time of] Bu-b.  A calamity will befall him, if he goes.  Disadvantageous in any way.

XXVI.  TAICHIKU  (Great storing or stopping).

 
 
   
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 

Tai-Chiku.  Advantageous to be constant.  It is lucky not to eat at home.  Advantageous to wade a large river.

Positive I.  There is a danger, and it is advantageous to desist.

Positive II.  The bolts securing wheels to the shaft are taken away from a carriage.

Positive III.  Drives a good horse.  Advantageous to be hardy and constant.  If he daily practices the arts of driving and guarding, it will be advantageous to advance.

Negative IV.  [Ties] a leading stick to a calf.  Perfectly lucky.

Negative V.  [Manages] the fangs of a castrated swine.  Lucky.

Positive VI.  How [vast] is the space of the Heaven!  Auspicious.

XXVII.  YI  (To feed).

 
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 

Yi.  Lucky, if just.  Observe the feeding, and look at your food.

Positive I.  You discard your character of a mysterious tortoise, and, looking at me, drop your jaw.  Unlucky.

Negative II.  Is fed by a wrong person.  This is at variance with a normal course of action.  It is fed at a hill, and it will be unlucky to advance.

Negative III.  Violates the [propriety of] feeding.  Unlucky, if constant.  Do not move for ten years.  Not advantageous in any respect.

Negative IV.  Is fed by a wrong person, but is lucky.  He looks about like a tiger and his passion is strong.  Free from blame.

Negative V.  Is at variance with a normal course of action.  He will be lucky, if he remains constant.  He ought not to wade a large river.

Positive VI.  All others are fed by him.  Lucky, though dangerous.  Advantageous to wade a large river.

XXVIII.  TAIKWA  (Superabundance of the Great).

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   

Tai-Kwa.  The ridge-pole of a roof bends.  Advantageous to advance.  Auspicious.

Negative I.  Spreads white rushes [and sprinkles oblation wine on them.]  Free from blame.

Positive II.  A dead willow puts out shoots.  An old man gets a bride.  Advantageous in every respect.

Positive III.  The ridge-pole of a roof bends.  Unlucky.

Positive IV.  The ridge-pole of a roof is high.  Lucky.  Inauspicious, when one is double-minded.

Positive V.  A dead willow produces flowers.  An old woman gets a bridegroom.  No blame, and no honour.

Negative VI.  Imprudently wades, and sinks to the top of his head.  Unlucky, but no one [save himself] is to blame.

XXIX.  KAN  (Difficulties).

   
 
 
 
   
 
   
 
 
 
   

Kan.  Truthful; and the mind is auspicious.  It is praiseworthy to go.

Negative I.  While training himself to face difficulties, tumbles into a pit.  Unlucky.

Positive II.  It being in the time of Kan, there is a difficulty.  [Positive II] is somewhat successful in his endeavours.

Negative III.  Dangerous either to retreat or to advance.  [Negative III] is amidst difficulties and assumes a reclining posture.  He tumbles into a pit.  Do not act [in this way].

Negative IV.  There are only one wine-tub, and two dishes; and earthen wares which have not been enamelled are used.  Confidential correspondences are carried through a window.  Free from blame in the end.

Positive V.  Water does not stand to fulness: and [Positive V] has already reached the level land.  Free from blame.

Negative VI.  Is bound with ropes and placed in the midst of a bush.  Unsuccessful for three years, that is, unlucky.

XXX.  RI  (To be related to).

 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 

Ri.  Advantageous to be constant.  Auspicious.  Lucky, if rear cows.

Positive I.  Tramps in a confused manner.  Free from blame, if he is cautious.

Negative II.  Is a yellow light.  Perfectly auspicious.

Positive III.  Is a light in the decline of the day.  If you do not beat the earthen drum and sing, you will have to regret your dotage.  Unlucky.

Positive IV.  Comes all of sudden.  He is burned.  He dies.  He is deserted.

Negative V.  Is wet with tears, and is overcome with grief.  Lucky.

Positive VI.  The king employs [Positive VI] to undertake an expedition.  Good fortune follows [the expedition]; the chief is beheaded, and his followers are exempted.  Free from blame.

XXXI.  KAN  (To impress, or all).

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
   

Kan.  Auspicious; advantageous to be constant, and lucky to take a woman in marriage.

Negative I.  Receives impression in the toe.

Negative II.  Receives impression in the calf, and will be unlucky; but will be lucky, if he remains quiet.

Positive III.  Receives impression in the thigh.  Inauspicious, if he advances relying upon [Negative VI].

Positive IV.  Will be lucky and free from remorse, if he is constant.  If you go about busily, your friends will obey your ideas.

Positive V.  Receives impression in the flesh along the spine, and will be free from remorse.

Negative VI.  Receives impression in the upper jaw, cheek, and tongue.

XXXII.  K  (Permanence).

   
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   

K.  Auspicious; free from blame; advantageous to be constant; advantageous to advance.

Negative I.  Seeks to be permanent in deepness.  Unlucky, though just.  Not advantageous in any way.

Positive II.  Is free from remorse.

Positive III.  Is not permanent in his virtues, and suffers obloquy.  Inauspicious, though just.

Positive IV.  No game is obtained in hunting.

Negative V.  Is permanent in his virtues, and is constant.  Lucky for women, unlucky for men.

Negative VI.  Is permanently in motion.  Unlucky.

XXXIII.  TON  (To Shun).

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
   

Ton.  Auspicious.  Somewhat advantageous to be constant.

Negative I.  The rear of the retreat is in danger.  Do not advance.

Negative II.  [Negative II and Positive V] are bound together with the hide of an yellow ox; and they can never be separated.

Positive III.  Is encumbered in retreat and is beset with sickness and danger.  Lucky to keep vassals and concubines.

Positive IV.  Retreats, though he is on intimate terms [with Negative I].  Lucky for honourable men, and unlucky for small-minded men.

Positive V.  Effects a happy retreat, and will be lucky, if he is constant.

Positive VI.  Retreats at a bound; advantageous in every way.

XXXIV.  TAI-S  (The strength of the great).

   
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Tai-s.  Is advantageous if just.

Positive I.  Is strong at foot.  Unlucky to advance.  This is certain.

Positive II.  Just and lucky.

Positive III.  Small-minded men take advantage of all their strength, but honourable men are indifferent.  Dangerous, even if just.  A male sheep strikes against a fence and injures his horn.

Positive IV.  Is just and lucky and free from remorse.  The fence opens itself and causes no embarrassment.  Strong, just as a large carriage is strong on account of the strength of the rims of its wheels.

Negative V.  Loses the sheep through the gentleness of his conduct, and is free from remorse.

Negative VI.  A male sheep strikes against a fence, and can neither retreat nor advance.  Not advantageous in any way.  Lucky, when he undergoes embarrassments.

XXXV.  SHIN  (To advance).

 
 
   
 
 
 
   
 
   
 
   

Shin.  Those feudal princes who are the securers of the peace of the country are frequently favoured [by the Emperor] with gifts of horses in abundance, and are granted audience with him three times a day.

Negative I.  Advances but is checked.  Lucky if he is just.  He is not trusted, but he will be free from blame if he keeps himself undisturbed and steady.

Negative II.  Advances but is sad.  Lucky if he is just.  He owes his great felicity to the Sovereigns mother.

Negative III.  Has the confidence of the multitude, and is without any remorse.

Positive IV.  Advances, but the big rat is in danger, even if he be just.

Negative V.  Is without any remorse.  Do not concern yourself about loss or gain.  You will be lucky to advance, and will have advantage in every way.

Positive VI.  Advances the horn and uses it in attacking the territory.  Lucky, though dangerous; and free from remorse.  Inauspicious, even if just.

XXXVI.  MEI-I  (An injured luminary).

   
 
   
 
   
 
 
 
   
 
 

Mei-i.  It will be advantageous to undergo hardships and to be constant.

Positive I.  Gets his brilliancy injured in flying, and drops his wings.  On retiring from service, honourable men do not take food three days.  They [have cause to] advance, but the master murmurs.

Negative II.  Injures his brilliancy by injuring his left thigh.  Lucky, if he is rescued with a strong horse.

Positive III.  Gets his brilliancy injured in hunting in the south; gets the principal prize.  The work of correction can not be effected quickly.

Negative IV.  Enters the left side of the abdomen; gets hold of the heart of Mei-i; and goes out of the gate.

Negative V.  Is the Mei-i of Ki-shi.  Advantageous to be constant.

Negative VI.  Loses brilliancy and is dark.  At first he ascends the Heaven and finally he enters the earth.

XXXVII.  KAJIN  (Members of a family).

 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
 
 

Kajin.  Advantageous to the constancy of women.

Positive I.  Manages the family affairs with caution and prudence; and is without any remorse.

Negative II.  Is in no way arbitrary, and superintends culinary affairs.  Lucky, if just.

Positive III.  The family is loud with complaints.  He, however, repents his severity, and is lucky.  The woman is gay and is at last inauspicious.

Negative IV.  Enriches the house, and is very lucky.

Positive V.  The sovereign is able to maintain the family, and will be lucky without anxiety.

Positive VI.  Is truthful, and is dignified.  Lucky in the end.

XXXVIII.  KEI  (Dissimilarity).

 
 
   
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 

Kei.  Advantageous in small things.

Positive I.  Is free from remorse.  He loses a horse, but he need not run after it, for it will come back of itself.  There will be no blame in seeing wicked men.

Positive II.  Meets the lord in the street.  Free from blame.

Negative III.  The carriage is pulled back, the ox is stopped.  His head is shaved and his nose is chopped off.  He has no good beginning, but has a good end.

Positive IV.  Is unsocial and isolated.  But he meets with magnanimous persons, and they put confidence to one another.  Free from blame, though dangerous.

Negative V.  Is without any remorse.  A member of the principal family eats into the skin.  What blame can there be in advancing?

Positive VI.  Is unsocial and isolated, sees a pig bearing dirt, and a cart conveying a devil.  At first, he draws the bow, but finally he stops it.  He does not mean to assault, but he wants to marry.  Lucky, if he advances and encounters rain.

XXXIX.  KEN  (Difficulty).

   
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
 
   

Ken.  Advantageous in the south-west, not advantageous in the north-east.  Advantageous to see great men.  Lucky, if constant.

Negative I.  Will get into trouble, if he goes; but he will get honour, if he comes.

Negative II.  The kings vassal is struggling hard, not on his own account.

Positive III.  Will get into trouble, if he goes; and to come is to return.

Negative IV.  Will get into trouble, if he goes; but he will find associates, if he comes.

Positive V.  Has got into a serious trouble, but friends will come.

Negative VI.  Will get into trouble, if he goes; while a great success will attend him, if he comes.  Lucky.  Advantageous to see great men.

XL.  KAI  (To open, to vanish away).

   
 
   
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   

Kai.  Advantageous in the southwest.  When there is no place to go, it will be lucky to come back.  When there is a place to go, it will be lucky to be quick.

Negative I.  Is free from blame.

Positive II.  Three foxes are obtained in hunting, and also yellow arrows.  Lucky, if constant.

Negative III.  Bears a burden and at the same time rides; invites enemies; inauspicious, even if just.

Positive IV.  Sever your thumb, and then your friend will come and believe you.

Negative V.  Honourable men cut off [their connection with small-minded men], and will be lucky.  The effect will be seen in small-minded men.

Negative VI.  A prince shoots with the bow a falcon on a high wall.  The bird is obtained, and it will be advantageous in every way.

XLI.  SON  (Loss).

 
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 
 
 

Son.  Is truthful, perfectly lucky, free from blame, and ought to be constant.  Advantageous to advance.  What should be used?  Two square dishes should be used in offering sacrifices.

Positive I.  Stops his business and goes at once, and is free from blame.  He loses with discretion.

Positive II.  Advantageous to be constant.  Unlucky to advance.  He will be able to benefit the superior without losing himself.

Negative III.  When three persons go, one of them will be lost.  When one person goes, he will get his friends.

Negative IV.  Shakes off his disease.  There will be rejoicings, if quickly done.  Free from blame.

Negative V.  A certain person makes him a present of ten h worth of tortoises.  No error is made.  Perfectly lucky.

Positive VI.  Benefits [others] without losing himself.  Free from blame; lucky if constant; advantageous to advance.  He gets vassals, but there is no house.

XLII.  EKI  (Gain).

 
 
 
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 

Eki.  Advantageous to advance; advantageous to wade a large river.

Positive I.  Advantageous to carry out a great undertaking.  Perfectly lucky, and free from blame.

Negative II.  A certain person makes him a present of tortoise worthy of ten h.  No error is made.  Forever constant, and lucky.  It will be lucky for a King to use this element for offering sacrifices to an Emperor.

Negative III.  Is benefited with an adversity, and is free from blame.  He is truthful and pursues a middle course.  He takes beads with him in conversing with a prince.

Negative IV.  Pursues a middle course, speaks to a prince, and is followed by him.  Advantageous to remove the capital.

Positive V.  Is truthful, and benevolent from heart.  It goes without saying, he is perfectly lucky.  He is truthful, and things repay his virtue.

Positive VI.  No one benefits him; a certain person strikes him.  He is inconstant in making resolutions.  Unlucky.

XLIII.  KWAI  (To clear away, to dispose of).

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Kwai.  [A negative element] is haughty in the royal yard, cries in earnest, and is in danger.  The warning is first given in the village.  Not advantageous to resort to arms; advantageous to advance.

Positive I.  Is strong in advancing his feet.  He advances, but is not victorious.  He is blamable.

Positive II.  Is afraid and cries.  An army will appear in the evening, but no anxiety need be felt.

Positive III.  Is strong in the cheek bone, and is unlucky.  Honourable men will decide on a resolute action.  [Positive III] goes alone and encounters rain.  He seems to be wet, and is the object of anger, but he is free from blame.

Positive IV.  There is no skin at the hip.  He is confused in walking.  He is led by a sheep and is without any remorse.  He does not believe what he hears.

Positive V.  Decides on a resolute action as readily as the purslane is teared.  As he pursues a middle course, he will be free from remorse.

Negative VI.  Does not cry, and is in the end unlucky.

XLIV.  K  (To meet).

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   

K.  A woman is powerful; do not receive the woman in marriage.

Negative I.  Is fastened to a metallic drag.  Lucky, if constant.  Unlucky, if he advances.  A weak pig really stumbles.

Positive II.  A fish is put in a sack.  Free from blame.  Not advantageous for guests.

Positive III.  There is no skin at the hip.  He is confused in walking.  Dangerous, but there will be no great blame.

Positive IV.  There is no fish in the sack.  An unlucky circumstance will be occasioned.

Positive V.  Wraps a melon with a leaf of the Ki (a tree with large leaves).  When he conceals his genius, something will come down from the Heaven.

Positive VI.  Meets the horn; inauspicious; but free from blame.

XLV.  SUI  (To assemble).

   
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
   
 
   

Sui.  Auspicious.  The King visits the ancestral shrine.  Advantageous to see great men; auspicious.  Advantageous to be constant.  Lucky, if large sacrifices be offered; advantageous to advance.

Negative I.  Is truthful, but does not hold fast to the last.  He is confused, and assembles.  He cries and laughs, shaking hands.  If he advances without any anxiety, he will be free from blame.

Negative II.  Lucky, and free from remorse, if he leads [other negative elements].  If truthful, advantageous to celebrate [Gods].

Negative III.  Assembles and is sad.  Not advantageous in any way.  Free from blame, if he advances.  Somewhat inauspicious.

Positive IV.  Will be free from blame, if he be exceedingly lucky.

Positive V.  Assembles [his subjects] and occupies his position; free from blame.  [Some elements] are not truthful [to him].  He will be without any remorse, if he be perfect, permanent, and constant.

Negative VI.  Sighs and sheds tears.  Free from blame.

XLVI.  SH  (To ascend).

   
 
   
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
   

Sh.  Perfectly auspicious.  Use it for seeing great men, and be not anxious.  Lucky to undertake a southward expedition.

Negative I.  Ascends with sincerity; exceedingly lucky.

Positive II.  If he be truthful, it will be advantageous to celebrate [Gods].  Free from blame.

Positive III.  Ascends to an empty village.

Negative IV.  The king offers sacrifices at Ki-san.  (The name of a mountain, at the foot of which was the capital of the kings of the dynasty of Shū, and where the welfare and happiness of the people are prayed for).  Lucky and free from blame.

Negative V.  Is constant and lucky, and ascends stairs.

Negative VI.  Ascends blindly.  Advantageous to be ceaselessly constant.

XLVII.  KON  (To be in difficulty).

   
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   

Kon.  Auspicious.  Constant; great men will be lucky and free from blame.  Words are not believed.

Negative I.  The hip is in difficulty on the stump of a tree.  He enters a deep valley and is not seen for three years.

Positive II.  Is in difficulty about drink and food.  A red apron comes to him.  Advantageous to offer sacrifices.  Unlucky to advance.  Free from blame.

Negative III.  Is in difficulty on a stone; leans on thorns; enters his house, but does not see his wife.  Unlucky.

Positive IV.  Is slow in coming; is in difficulty about a golden cart.  Inauspicious, but he will have a good end.

Positive V.  Is deprived of his nose and feet, and is in difficulty about red aprons, slowly comes glad news, and advantageous to offer sacrifices.

Negative VI.  Is in difficulty on account of the motion of vines.  He will have remorse, if he moves.  When there is remorse, it will be lucky to advance.

XLVIII.  SEI  (A well).

   
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
   

Sei.  A village may be shifted, but a well can not be.  Nothing is lost, and nothing is gained.  Those who go and those who come equally use a well as a well [ought to be used].  A well is almost approached, but before a rope is attached to the well (-bucket), the bucket is broken.  Unlucky.

Negative I.  The well is muddy and [its water] is not fit for drink.  No bird is found near the old well.

Positive II.  Shoots the funa (a kind of fish resembling the carp) in the side hole of a well.  The bucket is broken and leaks.

Positive III.  The well is clean, but [its water] is not used for drink.  One feels sad on this account.  The water ought to be drawn and used.  As the King is intelligent, [all the people] likewise receive felicity.

Negative IV.  The well is paved with stone; free from blame.

Positive V.  A clear limpid well, (the waters from) whose cold springs are [freely] drunk.

Negative VI.  The well (-water) is drawn [so constantly that] the covering is never put over it.  Truthful, and perfectly lucky.

XLIX.  KAKU  (To reform, to renew).

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 

Kaku.  Confidence is obtained on the last day.  Perfectly auspicious.  Advantageous to be constant.  Remorse disappears.

Positive I.  The leather of a yellow ox is used in tightening.

Negative II.  A reformation is effected on the last day.  Lucky to go, and free from blame.

Positive III.  Unlucky to advance.  Dangerous, though just.  Revolutionary proposals are effected three times.  Truthful.

Positive IV.  Remorse disappears.  He is truthful, and effects a revolution; lucky.

Positive V.  A great man effects a change like a tiger.  He will be trusted without divining.

Negative VI.  Honourable men change like a lizard, small-minded men change their features.  Unlucky to advance.  Lucky to be constant.

L.  TEI  (A three legged kettle).

 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   

Tei.  Perfectly lucky and auspicious.

Negative I.  The three-legged kettle is set with its feet upward, and it is advantageous to empty all unclean substances.  A concubine is obtained and a son is born to her.  Free from blame.

Positive II.  A three-legged kettle is full.  The enemy is sick, and is unable to approach [Positive II].  Lucky.

Positive III.  The ears of a three-legged kettle have changed, and its conveyance is hindered.  A pheasants fat can not be eaten.  It is about to rain; remorse is wanting; and finally lucky.

Positive IV.  The feet of a three-legged kettle are broken and the public food is thrown out; and [Positive IV] suffers a heavy penalty.  Unlucky.

Negative V.  A three-legged kettle has yellow ears and a golden handle.  Advantageous to be constant.

Positive VI.  A three-legged kettle has a handle of jewels.  Exceedingly lucky.  Advantageous in every way.

LI.  SHIN  (Thunder).

   
 
   
 
 
 
   
 
   
 
 

Shin.  Auspicious.  Consternation prevails when the thunder comes, but chuckling conversation [follows it].  The thunder astonishes one at a distance of a hundred ri; but one does not drop the spoon and wine-sprinkling vessel.

Positive I.  Is in consternation when the thunder comes, but engages in a chuckling talk afterwards.  Lucky.

Negative II.  Apprehends danger when the thunder comes.  He gets confused, and leaving his furnitures, he flies over nine hills.  Without searching after the furnitures, he gets them in seven days.

Negative IIIShin has feeble breath.  Free from calamity, if he goes timidly.

Positive IV.  Moves, but at last sinks down.

Negative VShin is in danger in going and coming.  [Negative V] is timid, but does not lose, and keeps his position.

Negative VIShin is in hurry, and the eyes are unsteady.  Unlucky to advance.  Shin does not touch his person, but it touches that of his neighbours.  Free from blame.  There will be murmur, if marriage is concluded.

LII.  GON  (To stop).

 
 
   
 
   
 
 
 
   
 
   

Gon.  One stops at the back and is not conscious of the body.  One goes to the yard, but does not see the men.  Free from blame.

Negative I.  Stops at the feet.  Free from blame.  Advantageous to be permanent and constant.

Negative II.  Stops at the calf of the leg.  He does not save his follower, and his mind is uneasy.

Positive III.  Stops at the waist, and rends open the flesh along the back-bone.  He is in danger and exposes the heart to smoke.

Negative IV.  Stops at the body, and is free from blame.

Negative V.  Stops at the mouth.  There is order in his words.  Remorse disappears.

Positive VI.  Is cautious in stopping.  Lucky.

LIII.  ZEN  (To proceed).

 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
 
   

Zen.  It will be lucky for women to marry; advantageous to be constant.

Negative I.  Storks proceed to the edge of the water.  Young ones are in danger.  There will be murmurings, but free from blame.

Negative II.  Storks proceed to a rock, and there they eat and drink, and enjoy themselves.  Lucky.

Positive III.  Storks proceed to the land.  A husband goes and does not come back.  A woman is pregnant but is not supported.  Unlucky.  Advantageous to defend foes.

Negative IV.  Storks proceed to a tree.  They may get on flat branches.  They will be free from blame.

Positive V.  Storks proceed to a hill.  A woman does not conceive for three years.  But nothing can defeat [Positive V]; and he will be lucky.

Positive VI.  Storks proceed to the region of clouds.  Their wings may be taken for models.  Lucky.

LIV.  KIMAI  (To give a daughter in marriage).

   
 
   
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 

Ki-mai.  Unlucky to advance.  Not advantageous in any way.

Positive I.  In giving a daughter in marriage, her younger sister is made to accompany her.  A lame person is able to walk.  Lucky to advance.

Positive II.  A blind person is able to see.  Advantageous for the constancy of a quiet person.

Negative III.  A daughter to be given in marriage is waiting, and [desires] to become a mistress.

Positive IV.  A daughter to be given in marriage has passed her age of marriage.  She is waiting for marriage.  She will have an opportunity.

Negative V.  A princess of blood is given in marriage.  Her sleeves are not so long as those of a mistress.  The moon is near fulness.  Lucky.

Negative VI.  A woman offers up a basket, but it is empty.  A gentleman cuts open a sheep, but no blood is found.  Not advantageous in any way.

LV.  H  (Affluence).

   
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 

H.  Auspicious.  The king attains it [H].  No anxiety need be felt; advantageous in the daytime.

Positive I.  Meets his partner.  Free from blame, though on equal terms.  There will be glad things, if he advances.

Negative II.  A shitomi (a kind of door which is opened or shut by being raised or lowered) is enlarged, and the star To is seen in the daytime.  He will be suspected and hated, if he advances.  He will be lucky, if he is truthful and opens [the mind of Negative V].

Positive III.  Tightens the tent, and small stars are seen in the daytime.  He has broken his right elbow.  Free from blame.

Positive IV.  A shitomi is enlarged, and the star To is seen in the daytime.  He meets his partner.  Lucky.

Negative V.  Invites a brilliant person.  He enjoys a happy reputation.  Lucky.

Negative VI.  Enlarges his house, but only serving a screen to his household.  Peeping through the door, it is found that the inside is quiet, and there is no person.  He is not seen for three years.  Unlucky.

LVI.  RYO  (A traveller).

 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
   

Ryo.  Is somewhat auspicious.  The traveller will be lucky if he is just.

Negative I.  A traveller is hasty.  This is the reason why he invites calamity.

Negative II.  A traveller puts up at an inn, embraces his money for travelling, and gets a faithful servant.

Positive III.  A traveller burns an inn, and loses his servant.  Dangerous, even if just.

Positive IV.  A traveller stops by the way, gets money and a travelling-sword.  His mind is not easy.

Negative V.  Shoots a pheasant and loses an arrow.  He will get honour in the end.

Positive VI.  A bird burns its nest.  A traveller at first laughs but afterward cries.  He loses an ox on account of his rashness.

LVII.  SON  (Meek).

 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
   

Son.  Somewhat auspicious.  Advantageous to advance; advantageous to see great men.

Negative I.  Advances and retreats.  Advantageous to be constant like a military man.

Positive IISon is beneath a chair.  If a multitude of diviners are employed, he will be lucky and free from blame.

Positive III.  Is incessantly meek.  Inauspicious.

Negative IV.  Remorse disappears.  He has obtained three articles on hunting.

Positive V.  Is just and lucky.  Remorse disappears.  Advantageous in every way.  There is no beginning but there will be an end.  It will be lucky three days previous to the day of Kanoye, and three days after the day of Kanoye.

Positive VISon is beneath a chair.  He loses his money and travelling-sword.  Unlucky, even if just.

LVIII.  DA  (To rejoice).

   
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 

Da.  Auspicious.  Advantageous to be constant.

Positive I.  Is conciliatory and joyful.  Lucky.

Positive II.  Is truthful and joyful.  Lucky; and remorse disappears.

Negative III.  Comes and rejoices.  Unlucky.

Positive IV.  Is considering joy, and is yet unsettled.  He borders on what would be injurious, but will not be evil.  If he keeps a sharp look-out, he will have joy.

Positive V.  Believes a plunderer.  He is in danger.

Negative VI.  Pulls and rejoices.

LIX.  KWAN  (To dissipate).

 
 
 
 
   
 
   
 
 
 
   

Kwan.  Is auspicious.  The King visits the ancestral shrine.  Advantageous to wade a large river; advantageous to be constant.

Negative I.  Saves himself.  Lucky, if the horse is strong.

Positive II.  Runs to his desk in the time of Kwan or dissipation.  Remorse disappears.

Negative III.  Dissipates his calamity.  Free from blame.

Negative IV.  Dissipates [the sorrows of] the multitude; perfectly lucky.  On dissipating, there is formed a hill.  This is beyond the comprehension of an ordinary intellect.

Positive V.  Issues rescripts in the time of Kwan like perspirations.  When [calamities] are dissipated from the Kings palace, it will be free from blame.

Positive VI.  Dissipates his blood.  It escapes out.  Free from blame.

LX.  SETSU  (Moderation).

   
 
 
 
   
 
   
 
 
 
 

Setsu is auspicious.  Excessive moderation ought not to be constant.

Positive I.  Does not go out of the outer yard.  Free from blame.

Positive II.  Does not go out of the yard inside the gate.  Unlucky.

Negative III.  When he does not follow moderation, he laments.  Free from blame.

Negative IV.  Is contented in moderation.  Auspicious.

Positive V.  Refines his moderation.  Lucky.  It is desirable to advance.

Negative VI.  Is excessive in moderation; unlucky, even if just.  Remorse disappears.

LXI.  CH-FU  (Truthful at heart).

 
 
 
 
   
 
   
 
 
 
 

Ch-fu.  Lucky, if truthful, even to a dolphin.  Advantageous to wade a large river.  Advantageous to be constant.

Positive I.  Is lucky, if thoughtful.  Unlucky, if doubtful-minded.

Positive II.  A screaming crane is in the shade.  Its offspring harmonizes with it.  I possess a good cup.  I shall keep it with you.

Negative III.  Gets an enemy.  He now beats a drum and then stops it; he now weeps and then sings.

Negative IV.  The moon is near the fulness.  The horses comrades are lost.  Free from blame.

Positive V.  Is truthful and linking (others) to him in closest union.  Free from blame.

Positive VI.  The voice of a cock rises up to the Heaven.  Unlucky, even if just.

LXII.  SH-KWA  (Superabundance of the small).

   
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
   

Sh-kwa.  Auspicious.  Advantageous to be constant.  Good for small matters; not good for large matters.  A flying bird leaves its voice.  Not suitable for advancing; suitable for descending.  Very lucky.

Negative I.  A flying bird is unlucky.

Negative II.  Passes by his grand-father, but meets his grand-mother.  He does not see the Sovereign, but meets the latters minister.  Free from blame.

Positive III.  Is not over-cautious.  If he follows [Negative VI], he may be injured; unlucky.

Positive IV.  Is free from blame.  He does not pass by [Negative V] and meets [Negative I].  Dangerous, if he advances.  He is dissuaded.  Do not use permanency and constancy.

Negative V.  Dense clouds, but without rain.  They come from our western outskirts.  The prince gets with bow that which lies in the hole.

Negative VI.  Does not meet [Negative V], but is beyond him.  A flying bird flies away from [its nest].  Unlucky.  It is calamitous.

LXIII.  KI-SEI  (Consummation).

   
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
 
 

Ki-sei.  Is somewhat auspicious.  Advantageous to be constant.  Lucky at first, but disturbed in the end.

Positive I.  Draws back the wheel, and gets his tail wet.  Free from blame.

Negative II.  A woman loses the blind of her carriage.  She does not search after it.  But it is recovered in seven days.

Positive IIIK-s [a wise king of the Dynasty of In] attacked Kih and defeated it in three years.  Small-minded men must not use armies.

Negative IV.  It leaks and rags are used.  Warning is observed the whole day.

Positive V.  The eastern neighbour kills an ox, but [his piety] is inferior to [that of] the western neighbour who offers [some slight] sacrifices and truly receives blessings.

Negative VI.  Gets his head wet; dangerous.

LXIV.  BI-SEI  (Not yet to be consummated).

 
 
   
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
   

Bi-sei.  Is auspicious.  A small fox has nearly crossed over, but gets his tail wet.  Not advantageous in any way.

Negative I.  Gets his tail wet.  Inauspicious.

Positive II.  Draws back the wheel, constant and lucky.

Negative III.  Not yet remedied and will be unlucky, if he advances.  Advantageous to wade a large river.

Positive IV.  Lucky if just, and remorse disappears.  He displays power and attacks Kih.  In three years, he is rewarded with a large country.

Negative V.  Lucky if just, and free from remorse.

He has the brilliancy of an honourable man.  He is truthful and lucky.

Positive VI.  Is truthful, and feasts.  Free from blame.  If he gets his head wet, he loses propriety, though he might be truthful.



THE END.