Forty-three Translations

Here are 43 translations of the text and first lines of Hexagrams 3 and 36 of the I Ching.

The “traditional” translation of the words xiang and zhen, found in the judgments of hexagrams 1 and 3 among other places, is something along the lines of, “success” and “perseverance.”  Modern scholarship tends to translate them more like, “sacrifice” and “omen.”  I have placed the latter group first.  I then gave preference to the “pheasant” versions as this seems to reflect more modern scholarship as well.  Besides this, they are not in any strict order.

No commentary is included; for this reason I did not include versions that were only commentary-like paraphrases without an actual translation.

See the index at the bottom of the page.




I CHING / YI JING
Transcription, Gloss, Translation

by Gregory C. Richter (downloadable from Richter’s site)

Zhûn
DIFFICULTY

DIFFICULTY.  MAJOR SACRIFICE.  FAVORABLE OMEN.
DIFFICULTIES.  Let a MAJOR SACRIFICE be conducted.  A FAVORABLE OMEN.

NOT ACT HAVE PURPOSE GO.  FAVORABLE APPOINT NOBLEMAN.
Do NOT PROCEED WITH a PURPOSE.  It is FAVORABLE to APPOINT feudal PRINCES.

1.  STONE PILLAR:  FAVORABLE DWELL OMEN.
STONE PILLARS:  a FAVORABLE OMEN for REMAINING AT HOME.

FAVORABLE APPOINT PRINCE.
It is FAVORABLE to APPOINT feudal PRINCES.

Míng Yí
THE BRIGHT PHEASANT

BRIGHT PHEASANT.  FAVORABLE DIFFICULT OMEN.
The BRIGHT PHEASANT.  The OMEN of DIFFICULTY is FAVORABLE.

1.  BRIGHT PHEASANT AT FLY, DROOP ITS WING.
The BRIGHT PHEASANT FLIES, DROOPING ITS WINGS.

NOBLE PERSON AT GO, THREE DAY NOT EAT.
The NOBLE PERSON TRAVELS, FASTING for THREE DAYS.

HAVE PURPOSE GO.  MASTER PERSON HAVE SPEECH.
PROCEED WITH a PURPOSE.  The MASTER will SPEAK.


The Original Yijing:  A Text, Phonetic Transcription, Translation, and Indexes, with Sample Glosses

by Richard Alan Kunst (available from UMI Dissertation Express, order number 8525020)

Zhûn

3.0  grand/treat/favorable/determination/don’t!/use/have/place-which/go/ favorable/establish/lord

3.1  turning round//favorable/dwell/determination/favorable/establish/lord

3.0  Grand treat.
A favorable determination.
Don’t use this in having somewhere to go.
Favorable for establishing a lord.

3.1  Turning around.
Favorable in a dwelling determination.
Favorable for establishing a lord.

Míng yí

36.0  favorable/hardship/determination

36.1  call/pheasant/go/fly/droop/DEF/wing/noble//go/travel/
three/days/not/eat/have/place which/go/host/person/there be/talk

36.0  Favorable in a hardship determination.

36.1  The calling pheasant in flight dips its wing:  the noble in travel will not eat for three days.
If he has somewhere to go, there will be talk among his hosts.


Zhouyi:  A New Translation with Commentary of the Book of Changes

by Richard Rutt

3  zhun / massed

Supreme offering.
Favorable augury.
Not for use when there is somewhere to go.
Favourable for appointing lordships.

Base (9):  

Wheeling around.

Favourable augury for a dwelling.
Favourable for appointing to lordships.

mingyi / crying pheasant  36

Favourable augury in hardship.

Base (9):  

A crying pheasant, flying on drooping wing.

A prince travels three days not eating a thing.
There is somewhere to go.
Those in charge grumble.


Divination, Order, and the Zhouyi

by Richard Gotshalk

SPROUTS BUNCHED TOGETHER

(The occasion calls for a) grand sacrifice.

A beneficial divination.
Do not act to have a place to go.
Beneficial to establish feudal lords.

9 at the beginning:

Pillars and posts, rock-like in their firmness and stability.
Beneficial to establish feudal-lords.
Beneficial dwelling-divination.

CALLING PHEASANT

A beneficial divination.
Beneficial hardship-divination.

9 at the beginning:
A calling pheasant going in flight, drooping its left wing; a nobleman going on a journey, not eating for three days.


I Ching (Classics of Ancient China)

by Edward L. Shaughnessy

[hexagram 23 in the Mawangdui manuscript]

ZHUN, “HOARDING”

Hoarding:  Prime receipt; beneficial to determine.  Do not herewith have someplace to go; beneficial to establish a lord.

Initial Nine:

To and fro;

beneficial to determine about a dwelling;
beneficial to establish a lord.

[hexagram 38 in the Mawangdui manuscript]

MINGYI, “CALLING PHEASANT”

Calling pheasant:  Beneficial to determine about difficulty.

Initial Nine:

The calling pheasant in flight,
drops its left wing:
The gentleman on the move,
for three days does not eat;

there is someplace to go;
the ruler has words.

I Ching

by Kerson and Rosemary Huang

3  RETRENCHMENT

Sign of the Great Sacrifice.
Auspicious omen.
Do not go anywhere.
Appoint helpers.

Build fences.
Settle down.
Appoint helpers.

36  THE CRYING PHEASANT

Good omen for one in hardship.

The crying pheasant is flying,
Its wings drooping.
A gentleman is journeying,
For three days hungering.
One goes somewhere,
And is reproached by the host.


The Basic Yi Jing, Oracle of Change

by Dany Chin and Budhy Chen

3.  Zhun / Beginning, Difficulty

Judgment

a) Great offering.
Favorable augury.
Do not use this in having somewhere to go.
Favorable to establish a lord.
b) Sublime accomplishment.
Determination is beneficial.
Do not use this hexagram
as an encouragement to undertake something.
Beneficial to establish order.

Base line, 9

  To and fro.
Favorable augury for a dwelling.
Beneficial to obtain a master.

36.  Ming Yi / Darkening Light, Pheasant

Judgment

a) Favorable augury in hardship.
b) Determination is beneficial in the face of difficulties.

Base line, 9

a) A crying pheasant
flies with drooping wings.
A noble person on travel does not eat for three days.
If there is somewhere to go, there will be talk.
b) As the light darkens,
one acts like a flying bird, lowering its wings.
The noble person, during his travel,
goes without food for three days.
When undertaking something
those in charge will grumble.

CHANGING Zhouyi :: The Heart of the Yijing

by Liu Ming

03 Zhun :: Sprouting
Supreme offering : favorable auspices :: No need to focus : appointing helpers is favorable
 
9 :: first There are omen, but no progress.  It is favorable to appoint helpers.
36 Mingyi :: Pheasant Call
Auspicious : even in hardship
 
9 :: first A pheasant flies and drops.  Traveling three days without food.  Secret words.

Book of Changes:  an Interpretation for the Modern Age

by Chan Chiu Ming

Hexagram 3  Tun—Difficulty

A sign of great fortune; an auspicious portent.  Do not travel afar.  It will be profitable to embark on a big enterprise which you may consider as important as the founding of a kingdom.

Line 1 (yang):  A horse trots; this is a good sign for he who wants to settle down; auspicious also for one who wants to embark on a big enterprise.

Hexagram 36  Ming Yi—Darkening of the Light

If you are asking about the difficulty you are facing, this portends good fortune.

Line 1 (yang):  The crying pelican (ming yi) is flying, its wings drooping.  The superior man is travelling.  He has not eaten anything for three days.  He has a long way to cover, and the lord has reprimanded him.


I Ching:  The Essential Translation of the Ancient Chinese Oracle and Book of Wisdom

by John Minford

Book of Wisdom:

HEXAGRAM III

Zhun

Difficult Birth

Supreme Fortune.
Profitable.
Steadfast.
A Destination
Is of no avail.
It Profits
To establish Lieutenants,
Oportet elevare principes.

Yang in First Place

Hesitation.
Caution.
It Profits
To remain Steadfast.
It Profits
To establish Lieutenants.

HEXAGRAM XXXVI

Ming Yi

Darkness

In hard times,
To be Steadfast
Profits,
In adversis
Soliditas.

Yang in First Place

Darkness
In flight.
Wings dipped.
The True Gentleman
On his travels
Fasts for three days.
A Destination.
The Master
Is ill spoken of.

Bronze Age Oracle:

HEXAGRAM 3

D’wen

Sprout

Supreme Fortune.
Sacrifice Received.
Profitable Augury.
Destination
Serves no purpose.
Profits
To licence lords.

Nine in First Place

Wheeling.
Augurs well
For a Dwelling.
Profits
To licence lords.

HEXAGRAM 36

Miang Dier

Pelican Calling

Profitable Augury
In hard times.

Nine in First Place

Pelican Calling
In flight,
Left wing dipped.
A noble man travels;
He fasts three days.
A Destination.
The Master
Finds fault.


The Duke of Zhou Changes:  A Study and Annotated Translation of the Zhouyi

by Stephen L. Field

3
Tun, A Bunch
  OMEN COUNSEL FORTUNE
0   Your primary plea is
heard.  A good omen.

Do not use this omen to
go on a journey.

Now is the time to
establish fiefdoms.
 
1 Back and forth. Good omen for occupying
a home.  Now is the time
to establish fiefdoms.
 
36
Ming Yi, The Calling Arrow-Bird
  OMEN COUNSEL FORTUNE
0   A good omen in times of
difficulty.
 
1 A calling arrow-bird in
flight locks its wings.

The nobleman on a
journey does not eat for
three days.



If there is a journey to
make, the ruler will have
something to say.
 

Yi Jing

by Jing Nuan Wu

Tun:  Sprouting

TUN:  The origin, a sacrificial offering, profit the divination.
No use in having a place to go to.
Advantage to establish feudal princes.

9-1
A huge rock and a white barked willow.  Advantageous to stay,
the divination.  Advantage to establish feudal princes.

Ming Yi:  Bright Bird, Brightness Obscured

MING YI:  Profit from difficulties, the divination.

9-1
The Bright Bird in flight lets fall its wings.
The superior man, in traveling three days, no food.
There is a place to go to.  Rule men with words.


I Ching:  The Shamanic Oracle of Change

by Martin Palmer and Jay Ramsay, with Zhao Xiaomin

3.  BIRTH PANGS
Chun

Original offering.  Favourable.  Do not start something lightly.  Advantageous to have hereditary leaders.

FIRST NINE

Difficulty moving ahead.  Helpful to be settled.  Useful to set up an hereditary ruler.

36.  DIMMING OF THE LIGHT
Ming I

The oracle says learn from difficulties.

FIRST NINE

The light is dimming, just as a bird in flight dips its wings.
The nobleman travels for three days and eats nothing.
Whichever place he goes to, the top people speak to him.


Yi Jing, book of sun and moon

by LiSe Heyboer.  Viewable online at www.yijing.nl/i_ching

Hexagram 03

Zhun

The spark of life

Sprouting:  Eminent - expansion.  Harvest - determination
No benefit to proceed probing
Harvest:  to install feudal lords

Initial 9:  Turning round and round.  Harvest:  a settling determination.  Harvest:  to install feudal lords.

Hexagram 36

MÍNG YÍ

Shooting down the Surplus Suns
(or the Bright Archer)

Hiding Brightness
Harvest:  a determination about difficulties

Initial 9:  Hiding brightness.  At flight, drooping one’s wings.  A noble man on the road does not eat for three days.  He proceeds probing.  The host has comments.


Rediscovering the I Ching

by Gregory Whincup

TÚN
GATHERING SUPPORT

Gathering support.
Gathering support is supremely blessed.
It is favorable to continue.
Do not advance.
It is favorable to appoint officers.

first line/9 —  Hesitating.
It is favorable to stay where one is.
It is favorable to appoint officers.

MÍNG ZHÌ
THE BRIGHT PHEASANT

The bright pheasant.

Despite adversity,
it is favorable to persevere.

first line/9 — 

The bright pheasant takes flight,
beating his wings.

A lord goes on a journey,
for three days he does not eat.

He goes to have words with his ruler.


Wu-Weifarer’s Yijing

viewable online at http://www.geocities.com/wu_weifarer/Yijing.html

3. Giving Birth.  A seedling struggles toward daylight.  Sublime success.  There is no advantage in trying to impose a plan.  Firm and yielding meet, and the birth is arduous.  Stirring up, taking risks from one’s stable center; one achieves great success through persevering.  Thunder and rain stir up abundance and heaven brings plants up out of the darkness.  It is advantageous to install helpers, without expecting the process to be comfortable.  One who follows the Way sorts out the threads and weaves them together.

Line 1:  An immovable rock.  It is favorable to stay put and install helpers.  Even if the rock seems immovable, moving with purpose is correct indeed.  To value what is lowly wins people over.

36. Dimming.  The light of the sun sinks into the earth and brightness is obscured.  Brightness within, gentle and yielding without.  Deliberately concealing one’s intelligence when oppressed, as King Wen did when he was held captive.  It is advantageous to persevere in adversity, dimming one’s light.  King Wen’s wise offspring used the time to distinguish the valuable from the worthless.  One who follows the Way lives amidst incorrectness by veiling one’s inner light, yet still shining.

Line 1:  The bright pheasant takes flight, its wings drooping.  One who follows the Way goes on a journey, not eating for three days.  Having a goal; going to speak to the chief.  Going hungry rather than sacrificing one’s principles.


The Authentic I-Ching:  A New Translation with Commentary

by Henry Wei

The CHUN Hexagram
(Symbol of Initial Difficulty)

The Chun Hexagram indicates great success and prosperity.  Advantageous to be firm and correct.  Do not act unless there is some possibility of success in doing so.  Advantageous to establish principalities.

Line 1, Yang:
One hesitates to advance.  Advantageous to remain firm and correct.  Advantageous to establish principalities.

The MING YI Hexagram
(Symbol of Darkened Light)

The hexagram indicates that advantage favors fortitude and firm correctness.

Line 1, Yang:
As the light dims, one acts like a flying bird suddenly drooping its wings.  The superior man is determined to depart for another place.  He may go without food for three days in a row.  He has some place to go, but people there will give him some displeasing words.


Total I Ching:  Myths for Change

by Stephen Karcher

3  Sprouting / The
World Tree
  ZHUN

Sprouting and Massing.
The Source of Success:  an Advantageous Trial.
Make and offering and you will succeed.
Do not use having a direction to go.
Advantageous to install lords as helpers.  Harvesting.

INITIAL NINE

Sprouting.  A stone pillar.
The riders wheel and turn.
Trial:  advantageous for a residence.  Harvesting.
Advantageous to install lords as helpers.

36  Brightness Hiding /
Calling Bird
  MING YI

Brightness Hiding.
Trial:  this hardship is advantageous.  Harvesting.

INITIAL NINE

Dark Bird calling.  Hiding your Brightness throught flight,
Dipping your wings in the waters.
Noble One goes three days without eating.
Have a direction to go.
Master your words to influence others.


I Ching:  Walking your path, creating your future

by Hilary Barrett

Hexagram 3, Sprouting

Sprouting.
From the source, creating success, constancy bears fruit.
Don’t use this to have a direction to go,
Fruitful to establish feudal lords.

Line 1 Encircled by stones.
Fruitful to settle with constancy,
Fruitful to establish feudal lords.

Hexagram 36, Brightness Hidden

Brightness hidden.
Constancy in hardship bears fruit.

Line 1 Brightness hidden, flying away,
His wings hanging down.
The noble one is on the move,
For three days, eats nothing,
Has a direction to go.
Those in authority have something to say.

The Complete I Ching:  The Definitive Translation

by the Taoist Master Alfred Huang

Zhun • Beginning

The beginning of a tiny sprout.
Sublimely prosperous and smooth.
Favorable to be steadfast and upright.
Do not act lightly.
There is somewhere to go.
Favorable to establish feudal lords.

1.   Initial Nine
Lingering and considering,
Favorable to abide in being steadfast and upright.
Favorable to establish feudal lords.

Ming Yi • Brilliance Injured

Brilliance Injured.
Favorable to be steadfast and upright in hardship.

1.   Initial Nine
Brilliance injured is flying,
Drooping its wings.
The sage evades,
Three days, ignores eating.
There is somewhere to go.
The host gossips.

I Ching:  The Classic Chinese Oracle of Change:  The First Complete Translation With Concordance

by Rudolf Ritsema and Stephen Karcher

SPROUTING • CHUN

Sprouting.
Spring Growing Harvesting Trial.
No availing-of posessing directed going.
Harvesting:  installing feudatories.

Initial nine

Stone pillar.
Harvesting:  residing-in Trial.
Harvesting:  installing feudatories.

BRIGHTNESS HIDING • MING YI

Brightness Hiding, Harvesting:  drudgery, Trial.

Initial nine

Brightness Hiding tending-towards flying.
Drooping one’s wings.
A chün tzu tending-towards moving:
Three days, not taking-in.
Posessing directed going.
A lord:  people posessing words.


The Original I Ching Oracle:  The Pure and Complete Texts with Concordance

by Rudolf Ritsema and Shantena Augusto Sabbadini

3  SPROUTING | Zhun

Sprouting.
Spring, Growing, Harvesting, Trial.
No availing
of posessing directed going.
Harvesting:  installing feudatories.

INITIAL NINE

A stone pillar.
Harvesting:  residing
in Trial.
Harvesting:  installing feudatories.

36  BRIGHTNESS HIDDEN | Ming Yi

Brightness hidden.
Harvesting:  drudgery.  Trial.

INITIAL NINE

Brightness hidden tends-towards flying.
Drooping one’s wings.

A jun zi tends-towards moving.
Three days not taking-in.
Posessing directed going.

A lordly person posesses words.


The I Ching or Book of Changes

by Richard Wilhelm and Cary F. Baynes

3.  Chun / Difficulty at the Beginning

DIFFICULTY AT THE BEGINNING works supreme success,
Furthering through perseverance.
Nothing should be undertaken.
It furthers one to appoint helpers.

Nine at the beginning means:
Hesitation and hindrance.
It furthers one to remain persevering.
It furthers one to appoint helpers.

36.  Ming I / Darkening of the Light

DARKENING OF THE LIGHT.  In adversity
It furthers one to be persevering.

Nine at the beginning means:
Darkening of the light during flight.
He lowers his wings.
The superior man does not eat for three days
On his wanderings.
But he has somewhere to go.
The host has occasion to gossip about him.


The I Ching Oracle

by Nigel Richmond (downloadable from Joel Biroco’s site)

“difficulty in beginnings”

Difficulty is followed by great success.
Continuance in the way is rewarded.
Remain in the existing, not seeking the new.
To appoint princes brings advantage.

Line 1 goes yin -

The hinderance of hesitation.
Be firm in perseverance.
To appoint princes brings advantage.

“darkening of the light”

Darkening of the light.
Continuance in the way despite difficulty.
Advantageous realizations.

Line 1 goes yin -

He flies with drooping wings.
The superior man, in his cycle, goes without food for three days.
The people speak of it.


The Classic of Changes:  A New Translation of the I Ching as Interpreted by Wang Bi

by Richard John Lynn

Zhun [Birth Throes]

Zhun consists of fundamentality [yuan], prevalence [heng], fitness [li], and constancy [zhen].  Do not use this as an opportunity to go forth.  It is fitting to establish a chief.

First Yang

One should tarry here.  It is fitting to abide in constancy.  It is fitting to establish a chief.

Mingyi [Suppression of the Light]

Suppression of the Light is such that it is fitting to practice constancy in the face of adversity.

First Yang

Suppression of the Light finds this one in flight, keeping his wings folded.  This noble man on the move does not eat for three days.  Whenever he sets off to a place, the host there has something to say about it.


Understanding the I Ching

by Tom Riseman

3.  CHUN (Jw’n)/Difficulty in the Beginning

Difficulty in the Beginning means great success and benefit through perseverance.
Nothing should be begun; helpers should be found.

Nine at the bottom:  difficulty and consideration.
Benefit if one perseveres correctly.

36.  MIN I (mingy’ee)/Darkening of the Light

Darkening of the light.
Adversity means benefit must accrue through persevering.

Nine at the bottom:  darkened light flies, with drooping wings.
The superior man fasts for three days during his wanderings.
But he has a destination.
His host derides him.


I Ching:  The Book of Change

by John Blofeld

CHUN  DIFFICULTY

Difficulty followed by sublime success!  Persistence in a righteous course brings reward; but do not seek some (new) goal (or destination); it is highly advantageous to consolidate the present position.

9 FOR THE BOTTOM PLACE  Uncertainty prevails.  It is best to make no move, but to build up determination and to consolidate the position.

MING I (pronounced MING YEE) DARKENING OF THE LIGHT.  INJURY

Darkening of the Light.  Righteous persistence in the face of difficulty brings reward.

9 FOR THE BOTTOM PLACE  Failure of the light during his progress through the sky caused him to lower his wings.  When busy with affairs, the Superior Man may go without food for three days on end, so intent is he on reaching his goal; but his lord will have something to say about this.


The Eclectic Energies I Ching

by Ewald Berkers.  Available at Eclectic Energies

3. Difficulties

Difficulties.
A foundation for progress.
It is beneficial to persist.
No use to have a goal to move to.
It is beneficial to appoint marquis.

Line 1:

A large stone grave post.
It is beneficial to persist staying put.
It is beneficial to appoint marquis.

36. Wounded Brightness

Wounded brightness.
Beneficial is laborious persistence.

Line 1:

Wounded brightness during flight,
lowering its wings.
The noble one on a journey,
for three days does not eat.
Having a place to go to.
The master and the people have a talk.


The Zhouyi and the First Four Wings of the Yijing
In Simple, Literal Translation

by Bradford Hatcher (downloadable from Hermetica.Info)

ZHUN1 (or TUN2), RALLYING

03.0, Rallying
Supreme fulfillment
Worthwile to be persistent
Not at all useful to have somewhere to go
Worthwile to enlist delegates

03.1, 1st 9

Cliffs all around
Worthwile to maintain resolve
Worthwile to enlist delegates

MING2 YI2, BRIGHTNESS OBSCURED

36.0, Brightness Obscured
Warranting difficult persistence

36.1, 1st 9

Brightness obscured during flight
Dragging one’s wing
The noble young one in traveling

Goes three days without a meal
When there is somewhere to go
Those in power would gossip


I Ching, The Oracle of the Cosmic Way

by Carol K. Anthony and Hanna Moog

3.  Making a New Beginning

It furthers one to persevere in not undertaking anything until clarity is attained.  It furthers one to appoint Helpers.

Line 1.  Hesitate, because there is a hindrance.  It furthers to remain persevering.  It furthers to appoint Helpers.

36.  Darkening of the Light

Darkening of the light.  In adversity it furthers one to hold fast to what is correct.

Line 1.  Darkening of the light during flight.  He lowers his wings.  In his depression he does not eat for three days on his wanderings; but he has somewhere to go.  The host has occasion to talk.


The Laws of Change:  I Ching and the Philosophy of Life

by Jack M. Balkin

Zhun • Difficulty in the Beginning

Difficulty in the Beginning.  Supreme success.
It is beneficial to persevere.
Do not use this as an opportunity to undertake anything.
It is beneficial to establish feudal lords.

Initial Nine (Ruling Line)

Back and forth; making no headway.
It is beneficial to remain persevering.
It is beneficial to establish feudal lords.

Ming Yi • Darkening of the Light

Darkening of the Light.
In adversity
It is beneficial to persevere.

Initial Nine

Darkening of the light during flight.
He lowers his wings.
The superior person does not eat for three days on his travels.
There is somewhere to go.
The host gossips.


I Ching:  The Book of Change

by Thomas Cleary

3.  Difficulty

Great success is beneficial for the honest.  Do not deliberately hold to a specific goal.  It is useful to establish local leaders.

1 yang.  When you are hesitant and not getting anywhere, it is advantageous to remain upright.  It is useful to set up local leaders.

36.  Injury to the Enlightened

When there is injury to the enlightened, it is beneficial to be steadfast and true in distress.

1 yang.  When the enlightened are injured in flight, they let their wings hang down.  Cultured people on a journey do not eat for three days.  When there is somewhere to go, the person in charge has a say.


The Taoist I Ching (Shambhala Classics)

by Thomas Cleary

3.  Difficulty

In difficulty, creativity and development are effective if correct.  Do not use.  There is a place to go.  It is beneficial to set up a ruler.

First yang:  Not going anywhere; it is beneficial to abide in correctness.  It is beneficial to set up a ruler.

36.   Concealment of Illumination
(Injury of Illumination)

In concealment of illumination, it is beneficial to be upright in difficulty.

First yang:  Concealing illumination in flight, letting the wings hang down; a superior man on a journey not eating for three days has a place to go.  The master is criticized.


The Buddhist I Ching

by Thomas Cleary

3.  Difficulty

Creativity is successful.  It is beneficial to be correct.  Do not make us of going somewhere.  It is beneficial to set up lords.

First yang:  Staying around, it is beneficial to remain correct.  It is beneficial to set up lords.

36.  Damage of Illumination
(Concealment of Illumination)

When illumination is damaged, it is beneficial to be upright in difficulty.

First yang:  Illumination concealed in flight, letting the wings droop, superior people on a journey, not eating for three days, have a place to go.  The ruler has something to say.


The Fortune Teller’s I Ching

by Man-Ho Kwok, Martin Palmer, and Joanne O’Brien

CHUN
Birth Pangs

Birth pangs.  He will be successful if he behaves properly.  Beware of starting a new venture without giving it sufficient thought.  It will be useful to enlist the help of an experienced person.

FIRST NINE

The way ahead is blocked.  Remain firm.  Act sensibly.  Listen to the advice of someone more experienced.

MING I
Brightness Dimmed

Brightness dimmed.  It is wise to appreciate the dangers and behave properly.

FIRST NINE

The brighness is dimmed with flying and he lowers his wings.  The wise man goes away and does not eat for three days.  Wherever he travels people speak of him unkindly.


The I Ching:  The Book of Changes

by James Legge

THE KUN HEXAGRAM.

Kun (indicates that in the case which it presupposes) there will be great progress and success, and the advantage will come from being correct and firm.  (But) any movement in advance should not be (lightly) undertaken.  There will be advantage in appointing feudal princes.

I.  The first line, undivided, shows the difficulty (its subject has) in advancing.  It will be advantageous for him to abide correct and firm; advantageous (also) to be made a feudal ruler.

THE MING Î HEXAGRAM.

Ming Î indicates that (in the circumstances which it denotes) it will be advantageous to realise the difficulty (of the position), and maintain firm correctness.

I.  The first line, undivided, shows its subject, (in the condition indicated by) Ming Î, flying, but with drooping wings.  When the superior man (is revolving) his going away, he may be for three days without eating.  Wherever he goes, the people there may speak (derisively of him).


Takashima Ekidan

by Shigetake Sugiura, translated from the work of Kaemon Takashima.  Downloadable from Google Books (U.S. only), as well as Joel Biroco’s site.

III.  CHUN (Fulness).

Chun.  Perfectly auspicious; advantageous to be constant; not propitious to make movements; advantageous to establish dukedoms.

Positive I.  Is at a stand-still; advantageous to be constant; and advantageous to be created a duke.

XXXVI.  MEI-I (An injured luminary).

Mei-i.  It will be advantageous to undergo hardships and to be constant.

Positive I.  Gets his brilliancy injured in flying, and drops his wings.  On retiring from service, honourable men do not take food three days.  They [have cause to] advance, but the master murmurs.


Unveiling the Mystery of the I Ching

by Tuck Chang.  Viewable online at www.iching123.com

3 Zhun1

Text:  Zhun (difficult to initiate), great and smooth progress; it is advantageous (or appropriate) to persist; do not take action to go somewhere; it is advantageous (or appropriate) to establish the ducal state.

The 1st line

Text:  Hovering; it is advantageous (or appropriate) to persist in remaining steadfast; it is advantageous (or appropriate) to establish the ducal state.

36 Ming2 Yi2

Text:  Ming Yi (brightness being tarnished); it is appropriate (or advantageous) to persist adamantly (or in plight).

The 1st line

Text:  Ming Yi (brightness being tarnished) is flying, (and) with its wing hanging down.  The gentleman is on a journey; no food has been taken for three days.  To go somewhere, (wherein) the host gossips.


The Tao of I Ching:  Way to Divination

by Tsung Hwa Jou

Tún

Tún leads to great success.  It is worth persisting.  Nothing should be done right now.  It is a good idea to get helpers.

1st Yao.  One hesitates on finding a blockage.  It is worth persisting towards the goal.  It is worthwile finding helpers.

Míngyí

Míngyí.  In bad times it is favorable to be persevering.

1st Yao.  Míngyí.  During flight.  You lower your wings.  You find no food for three days on your wanderings.  But you have a destination.  Your host gossips about you.


I Ching:  The Book of Changes and the Unchanging Truth

by Hua-Ching Ni

3  Chun
To be stationed • To assemble

GUIDANCE:  “Be stationary and firm; do not move.  It is helpful to establish leadership in a new community.”

Line 1:  “He lingers for a while.  It is suitable to stay and settle down.”

36  Ming Yi
The time of darkness

GUIDANCE:  “At the time of darkening, one should correctly respond to one’s difficulties.”

Line 1:  “On a journey, the wise one does not stay where people create trouble for him.  Even though there may be food or shelter, he moves on.”


The Pocket I Ching

by Richard Wilhelm and Cary F. Baynes, edited and simplified by W. S. Boardman

RESOLVING CHAOS

Chaos and darkness whilst heaven creates.
In times of difficulty at the beginning,
Persevere.  Appoint helpers.  Do not rest.
For in this way comes success.

1.  Hesitation; hindrance.  Appoint helpers.
Be steadfast.  Rule by serving.  Success.

DARKENING OF THE LIGHT

In adversity one must be persevering.
The light is veiled, not extinguished.
By clarity within and devotion without
One can overcome the greatest adversity.

1.  Flight and deprivation.  But one has a goal.


The Original I Ching:  An Authentic Translation of the Book of Changes

by Margaret J. Pearson.

3 (zhūn) Sprouting

Sprouting ensures continuing growth.  Persistence is effective; don’t start a journey now.  It is good to delegate responsibilities to those you trust.

•  Nine in the first place:  Pacing back and forth.  Persisting where you are is effective, as is appointing helpers.

36 (míng yí) Wounded Light

The light is wounded.  In difficulties, it is effective to persevere.

•  Nine in the first place:  Light wounded in flight.  You fold your wings.  When those worthy of power travel, for three days they do not eat.  You have a destination, and a host with words.

The Essentials of the Yi Jing

by Chung Wu, Ph.D.

3.  Zhun, Distress

Zhun is primordial, pervasive, prosperous, and persevering.  The subject should proceed with caution.  It will be advantageous to establish marquisates.

First nine.  There is a formidable obstruction to advance.  It will be advantageous, however, to remain persevering.  It will be advantageous also to establish marquisates.

36.  Ming Yi, Light Obliterated

Ming Yi indicates that it is advantageous to be persevering in time of danger.

First nine.  It is like a bird in flight with its wings drooping.  If the jun zi takes a journey, he may go without food for three days and his host will have words about his undertakings.


Index:
I Ching, The Oracle of the Cosmic Way by Carol K. Anthony and Hanna Moog
The Laws of Change:  I Ching and the Philosophy of Life by Jack M. Balkin
I Ching:  Walking Your Path, Creating Your Future by Hilary Barrett
The Eclectic Energies I Ching by Ewald Berkers
I Ching:  The Book of Change by John Blofeld
Unveiling the Mystery of the I Ching by Tuck Chang
The Basic Yi Jing, Oracle of Change by by Dany Chin and Budhy Chen
I Ching:  The Book of Change by Thomas Cleary
The Buddhist I Ching by Thomas Cleary
The Taoist I Ching by Thomas Cleary
The Duke of Zhou Changes by Stephen L. Field
Divination, Order, and the Zhouyi by Richard Gotshalk
The Zhouyi and the First Four Wings of the Yijing by Bradford Hatcher
Yi Jing, book of sun and moon by LiSe Heyboer
The Complete I Ching:  The Definitive Translation by the Taoist Master Alfred Huang
I Ching by Kerson and Rosemary Huang
The Tao of I Ching:  Way to Divination by Tsung Hwa Jou
Total I Ching:  Myths for Change by Stephen Karcher
The Original Yijing by Richard Alan Kunst
The Fortune Teller’s I Ching by Man-Ho Kwok, Martin Palmer, and Joanne O’Brien
The I Ching:  The Book of Changes by James Legge
The Classic of Changes:  A New Translation of the I Ching as Interpreted by Wang Bi by Richard John Lynn
I Ching:  The Essential Translation of the Ancient Chinese Oracle and Book of Wisdom by John Minford
Book of Changes:  an Interpretation for the Modern Age by Chan Chiu Ming
CHANGING Zhouyi :: The Heart of the Yijing by Liu Ming
I Ching:  The Book of Changes and the Unchanging Truth by Hua-Ching Ni
I Ching:  The Shamanic Oracle of Change by Martin Palmer and Jay Ramsay, with Zhao Xiaomin
The Original I Ching:  An Authentic Translation of the Book of Changes by Margaret J. Pearson
The I Ching Oracle by Nigel Richmond
I CHING / YI JING by Gregory C. Richter
Understanding the I Ching by Tom Riseman
I Ching:  The Classic Chinese Oracle of Change by Rudolf Ritsema and Stephen Karcher
The Original I Ching Oracle by Rudolf Ritsema and Shantena Augusto Sabbadini
Zhouyi:  A New Translation with Commentary of the Book of Changes by Richard Rutt
I Ching (Classics of Ancient China) by Edward L. Shaughnessy
Takashima Ekidan by Shigetake Sugiura, translated from the work of Kaemon Takashima
The Authentic I-Ching:  A New Translation with Commentary by Henry Wei
Rediscovering the I Ching by Gregory Whincup
The I Ching or Book of Changes by Richard Wilhelm and Cary F. Baynes
The Pocket I Ching by Richard Wilhelm, Cary F. Baynes, W. S. Boardman
The Essentials of the Yi Jing by Chung Wu, Ph.D.
Yi Jing by Jing Nuan Wu
Wu-Weifarer’s Yijing