A Baryta Inkjet Paper Comparison


Ilford Galerie Gold Fibre Silk, a baryta-coated inkjet paper, fills a niche as one of the brightest and whitest papers in its class.  Doubts about its continued availability arose a few years ago during Ilford’s financial difficulties; but it appears that it is still being manufactured, and distributed under several different brands.  I have made some measurements to compare the following three papers:

Ilford Galerie Gold Fibre Silk, available from B&H Photo;
Arista-II Baryta Photo, the house brand of Freestyle Photographic Supplies;
Simply Elegant Gold Fiber, similarly distributed by Atlex.

Being a “store brand” kind of person myself, my goal was to test the hypothesis that these three brands are all the same paper.

They are all 310gsm weight Baryta-coated papers.


Observation

The papers appear identical in color (warm white), finish (semi-gloss with a very very fine texure), and feel (stiff, like very thin cardboard; hardly any tendency for the sheets to curl; the Ilford roll paper has a fixed curl to it).


Spectrophotometer measurements

Each paper’s reflectance was measured using Argyll CMS spotread and an i1Pro spectrophotometer with UV cut.

The Lab values (average of 20 meaurements):

Ilford: 99.850507-1.2071990.909499
Arista: 99.992160-1.3973830.845685
Simply Elegant: 99.688297-1.2008200.833336

The spectral reflectance value plots (selected from several):




The blacklight test

Below are pieces of all three papers on a background of Canon Fine Art Natural, which has no optical brightening agents; above them is a piece of Canon Satin Photo 240gsm, which is loaded with them.  It appears that the baryta papers may all have the same small amount of OBAˆs:




Profiling

The papers were profiled with the i1Pro and i1Publish by X-Rite, 1280 patches.

The three superimposed profile gamuts (they are identical):


gamutsL   gamutsa   gamutsa

The same image printed on each paper, all using the Ilford profile, and the Ilford media configuration:




Are these three labels the same paper?  You decide . . . .